Things to Do in Copenhagen (Part 2)

Last month, I had a wonderful time with fellow blogger Debbie, visiting the beautiful city of Copenhagen in Denmark. Here’s part two of ten things we enjoyed and would suggest you give a go too – read part one here

A post shared by Stacey (@prettybooks) on


Go on… a canal tour
I’ve been on canal tours in Bruges and Amsterdam, so it was a ‘must do’ for me in Copenhagen! It’s a great way to explore the city, especially if you’re exhausted. You can just sit there and soak up the sun and sights (in my case, a little too much sun – I got burned!). We passed The Little Mermaid statue, the Black Diamond (Royal Library), Nyhavn and lots more.

A post shared by Stacey (@prettybooks) on


Eat at… Höst, Granola and the Andersen Bakery
If you’re not a foodie, look away now. One of the best things about going on holiday, in my opinion, is eating lots of food. We treated ourselves to a stunning Nordic tasting menu at Höst (six fancy dishes, from lobster sauce and venison to lemon & thyme juice and beer ice cream), ate an amazing ‘sweet plate’ breakfast at Granola (including a mini cinnamon snail and chocolate spread) and had delicious hot chocolate & cakes at the Andersen Bakery. I wish I could do it all over again!

A post shared by Stacey (@prettybooks) on


Visit… the National Museum
The National Museum is a bright and airy (free) museum! I enjoyed visiting the toys exhibition, wandering around old dollhouses and vintage toys, and exploring the modern history of Denmark. There’s an impressive amount of museums in Copenhagen and sadly we couldn’t visit them all. We also took a trip to Christiansborg Palace and visited the royal kitchens and palace ruins, but unfortunately the lift to the tower was broken so we didn’t get to go up. VisitCopenhagen.com is a superb resource that I found immensely helpful when planning our trip.

A post shared by Stacey (@prettybooks) on


Eat at… Slice of San Francisco
All right, so it’s not Danish, but it serves the most amazing cheesecake in Copenhagen. It’s owned by San Franciscan Miriam, who bakes all the cheesecakes herself. She also makes an incredible chicken burrito, which we shared before tucking into creamy cheesecake – I had cherry and cinnamon compote and Debbie had blueberry-rose. It was a lovely place to relax before heading to the Tivoli Gardens. But trust me, don’t go on a spinning ride straight after! Check out scandinaviastandard.com for a longer review and more mouth-watering photos.

A post shared by Stacey (@prettybooks) on


Visit… Christiania

If you’re on a budget, simply walking around the streets of Copenhagen is a treat in itself. Christiania was a neighbourhood that I was told I must visit, and I’m glad we did. It’s Copenhagen’s famous freetown, super quirky and chilled – possibly due to there being hash dealers everywhere! That’s not to say it’s legal, however. It was fascinating to walk around, but you need to follow the rules, such as not taking photos inside the community or running (it causes panic!). Despite this, we felt safe exploring the area.

A post shared by Stacey (@prettybooks) on


I loved Copenhagen so much and would definitely go back. You can never have too many cinnamon snails.

Things to Do in Copenhagen (Part 1)

Only a few days before the upsetting and unbelievable Brexit madness, I had a wonderful time in Europe with fellow blogger Debbie, visiting the beautiful city of Copenhagen in Denmark. Here are five things that I enjoyed and think you might too.

A post shared by Stacey (@prettybooks) on


Visit… the Tivoli Gardens
The amusement park that inspired Walt Disney is tourist staple and it’s easy to see why. Buy the unlimited wristband so you can go on as many rides as you like – we went on the same one five times. And there are no queues! At the end of the evening, they put on a fantastical light and sound show with fire and smoke. It was magical.

A post shared by Stacey (@prettybooks) on


Climb… Vor Frelsers Kirke (Church of Our Savior)
If you’re looking for an amazing view and love to climb, go up the 400 steps of this stunning spire. There’s a mixture of tiny wooden steps inside and wider metal steps outside. It’s such a great climb and considering that it has more steps than Covent Garden station (193), it doesn’t tire you out too much.

A post shared by Stacey (@prettybooks) on


Visit… the supermarkets and convenience stores
If you want ‘local’ snacks, always visit the supermarkets. It’s fun to walk around, discovering all the Scandinavian brands and unusual snacks (like Skumbananer). We shopped in Netto and I bought chocolate biscuits for my colleagues instead of going to a fancy tourist shop – they went down a treat! And 7-Eleven had the best cinnamon snail we tasted. Hands down.

A post shared by Stacey (@prettybooks) on


Eat at… Paludan BogCafe (Book Cafe)
You won’t find this beautiful cafe in many guide books. I came across it while looking for bookish places to visit. It’s a former university library turned student cafe and it was an excellent place to grab a delicious sandwich with new potatoes and the best hot chocolate we had on the trip. It was one of the best (and cheapest!) meals we had – being surrounded by books also helped!

A post shared by Stacey (@prettybooks) on


Ride… the City Bikes

But only if you’re tall! Copenhagen is famous for its cyclists and bike-friendly streets. One evening, after eating gelato by the canal, we thought it would be an excellent idea to grab a City Bike and cycle home. That is, until we realised we were way too short – even when we made the saddle go as low as possible. It was too difficult for us (read, me) to stop the bikes, so we ended up cycling around the bike stand for an hour instead. It was hilarious and the motor on the bikes made it so much fun.

A post shared by Stacey (@prettybooks) on


Stay tuned for part two!