Pokémon Go Book Tag

Pokémon Go Book Tag
I’m addicted to PokémonGo as much as the rest of the world. I was scrolling through Twitter when I came across this creative book tag by Read at Midnight – I knew I had to do it. Her graphics are also super cute!

Pokémon Go Book Tag
Some of the earliest books I read were Enid Blyton’s Malory Towers series, Five on Treasure Island (I didn’t get very far in the series….!) and Tales of Mr. Pink-Whistle. I also wanted to be Milly-Molly-Mandy. Even though I read these books over 20 years ago, I still remember the thrill of re-reading them over and over, and they introduced me to the world of books.

Pokémon Go Book Tag
Even though I only read them both a few years ago, I’m sure Matilda and Jane Eyre will be two of my favourite classics for years to come, with magical storylines and wonderful heroines.


I honestly cannot think of one! I’m more likely to want to read a book – especially if it’s one I didn’t really know about or one I’m already slightly interested in – if many of the bloggers I follow are excited about it. I’d hate to miss out on an incredible book, so I’m always intrigued when one is everywhere. It’s why A Darker Shade of Magic is high on my TBR!

pokemon-tag-04-ditto
I read a lot of young adult contemporary novels that remind me of each other and three that come to mind are Saint Anything, My Life Next Door and When We Collided – but they were all five-star reads for me! I loved the boys, the families, and the fun, emotional storylines.

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What I’ve Read / Beautiful Broken Things, Head Over Heels & The Ballroom

What I've Read / Beautiful Broken Things, Head Over Heels & The Ballroom
Here are three reviews of books I’ve read recently!

Beautiful Broken Things by Sara Barnard
If you’re looking for books about female friendship, Beautiful Broken Things is an excellent place to start. It has one of the most honest accounts of friendship I’ve read so far. It tackles that intense feeling experienced when one of your best friends becomes better friends with someone else and what it’s like to see your friendship falling away – and not knowing what to do about it.

Caddy and Rosie are super close until new girl Suzanne comes along. She’s interesting and fun and beautiful. Caddy is suspicious of her until she finds out something from Suzanne’s past that no one else knows. As Suzanne opens up, Caddy finds herself drawn to this fascinating person who’s so different to herself – more daring, more fun, more exciting.

Beautiful Broken Things is difficult to read at times – Suzanne’s mental health and the things she’s experienced are horrendous. And at times it’s tricky to like Caddy as a character, with her comparably easy life of private school and zero Significant Life Events. And yet there are many people out there who haven’t had something traumatic happen to them but struggle through life all the same; feeling the pressure of society, parental expectation and their own self-criticism. Beautiful Broken Things shows what happens when Caddy and Suzanne are convinced they need each other – and who’s to say they don’t?

Head Over Heels & Sunny Side Up by Holly Smale
Oh, what fun it is to see Harriet Manners again! Every time I pick up a new Geek Girl story, I’m transported to a happy place.

Head Over Heels is the fifth book in the series the perfect mix of modelling and the equally as eventful world of Harriet Manners. Team JINTH (Jasper, India, Nat, Toby and Harriet) have it down: they frequently meet at their favourite coffee shop (and have allocated seats) and have pre-planned sleepovers (Harriet has the schedule written up). Harriet’s had a difficult time making close friends up until now and so it was great to see her in this dynamic, even though it’s not as easy as she might think. And it was lovely to greet the supporting characters we know so well and love, from Wilber (even if he isn’t completely himself lately) and Richard (ever the quirky parent) to Rin (still kawaii) and baby sister Tabitha (and potential future model). I had a brilliant time reading Harriet’s fifth adventure – this time set in beautiful, colourful India – and didn’t want it to end.

But Sunny Side Up helped fill the spot nicely, with Harriet on a trip to Paris Fashion Week. I read it after Head Over Heels, but it actually takes place before the fifth book (a little tip!). It’s a short, sweet and fabulous summer novella, with more stunning outfits and hilarious antics. I also enjoyed the extra short: we get to see the first time Lion Boy meets Harriet, from his point of view. I’m ready for you, book six!

The Ballroom by Anna Hope
I’ve always been slightly fascinated by asylums – how easy it is to get committed, how difficult it is to get out, what defines mental illness and the blurry line between “sane” and “insane”. Asylums are a common appearance in horror stories, but they were a genuine horror for the people who had to stay in them.

The Ballroom is set in Sharston, an asylum located on the edge of the Yorkshire moors in the early 1900s. We hear from John Mulligan and Ella Fay – who meet and dance in the asylum’s elegant ballroom, a privilege provided to well-behaved patients – and Charles Fuller, a doctor who writes and researches the eugenics movement. Charles proposes that music therapy can improve the lives of patients, or the “feeble-minded” – until the reader begins to believe that Charles may be the only one who truly belongs at Sharston.

The Ballroom is incredibly compelling and one of the few adult novels I’ve had the chance to read this year. John and Ella’s developing romance is heartbreaking, as is the life of Clem, a bookish friend that Ella in her dorm. Eerie, bleak historical fiction that somehow still manages to leave you hoping.

George’s Marvellous Medicine by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake (Classic #5)

George's Marvellous Medicine by Roald Dahl (Classic #5)

Shelved: Classic (children’s, humour)
Published: 1981
Rating: ★★★★
Challenge: Classics – #5
Buy: Foyles
More: Goodreads

This is my fifth post for the 2016 Classics Challenge – sign up and join 450+ other people in reading one classic each month.

George is alone in the house with Grandma. The most horrid, grizzly old grunion of a grandma ever. She needs something stronger than her usual medicine to cure her grouchiness. A special grandma medicine, a remedy for everything. And George knows just what to put into it. Grandma’s in for the surprise of her life—and so is George, when he sees the results of his mixture!

WHEN I Discovered This Classic
I wasn’t aware of George’s Marvellous Medicine until I bought my beautiful Roald Dahl box set three years ago. I’ve been slowly (obviously!) making my way through it and it was George’s time.

George's Marvellous Medicine by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake (Classic #5)WHY I Chose to Read It
Much like with Agatha Christie, it was time for my annual dose of Dahl.

WHAT Makes It A Classic
It’s one of Roald Dahl’s lesser-known novels – a short and eccentric story about what happens when you get a taste of your own medicine.

WHAT I Thought of This Classic
George’s Marvellous Medicine was super fun! What happens when an 8-year-old boy tries to kill his horrible old grandma (who he believes is a witch) with a home-made concoction? Chaos!

Most of the story is made up of George brewing his inventive medicine, throwing in anti-freeze, horse tranquillizers, engine oil and much more. I enjoyed seeing what George was going to add next – and I couldn’t help feeling a little terrified! If you did drink his medicine, it would almost certainly kill you. But it was fun seeing what happened when George tried to replicate his potion… including his grandma turning into a really tall chicken. It’s not my favourite Roald Dahl so far, but it was short and sweet.

“Never grow up…always down.”

WILL It Stay A Classic
I’m sure Roald Dahl’s stories will be read for many years to come!

WHO I’d Recommend It To
People who have only read Roald Dahl’s most popular books. People who love short, quirky stories.